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Terrell Edmunds has zero ball awareness

Discussion in 'Steelers Talk' started by Benny Lava, Nov 12, 2019.

  1. JAD

    JAD Well-Known Member

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    What gets me about Terrell is that Zero Ball Awareness is something coaches should easily see by watching film or even at the combine. He didn't just get his Zero Ball Awareness, he never had it and when you invest in a no. 1 they should of seen this. Agree with Mac the Steelers panicked like they do at times.
     
  2. Stone

    Stone Well-Known Member

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    This is the exact same logic I apply to MR. He has "always" thrown from his back foot, and he "never" had to go through read progressions. And like Edmunds, nothing has changed.

    Never say never!

    Always avoid saying always!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Stone

    Stone Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever noticed how we as human being tend to associate a persons avatar with that person? I think yours is probably the most accurate of all! I can see you sitting in your recliner, doing a face-palm at the TV, your dog, your wife, your kids, the plumbing, the lights, the door-bell, the carpet, the ceiling, the Steelers, the NFL, .......

    Just messin with ya:drinks:
     
  4. blackandgoldpatrol

    blackandgoldpatrol Well-Known Member

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    Edmunds is one of the most physically gifted athletes in the league, which will garner him more time to develop due to coaches not wanting to give up on such ability...… in the end, he may be like mark barron, and have to add a little more bulk and move up to ilb
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. jeh1856

    jeh1856 Hello

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    He may have the athletic ability, but so far he doesn't seem to have the natural defensive smarts. Lots of great athletes make lousy NFL players. You can’t teach smarts? Otherwise, just draft Olympic atheletes and teach them football?

    On a side note, I do think teaching heavyweight wrestlers to be offensive guards should be pursued more. That has worked in the past.
     
  6. Roonatic

    Roonatic Well-Known Member

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    I'd put Edmunds on par with Sean Davis. Similiar athletes that Tomlin has a vision for. He needs to take these type of players in the lower rounds & go with more experienced football players at their position in the higher rounds. My opinion.
     
  7. SteelerNole

    SteelerNole Well-Known Member

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    Taylor?? Ike Taylor? That guy was always toast.
     
    • Disagree Disagree x 3
  8. NY STEELERFAN

    NY STEELERFAN Well-Known Member

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    There is a lot of talk on sirius radio about olineman with wrestling backgrounds..........they love them.
     
  9. Formerscribe

    Formerscribe Well-Known Member

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    I think Carlton Haselrig was more the exception than the rule. I'm sure there are plenty of guys who made the NFL who wrestled along with playing football at some point, but I'm not sure if anybody else has done what Haselrig did.
     
  10. jeh1856

    jeh1856 Hello

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    Carlton always stuck in my head. I’m thinking that in the US any wrestler who could play guard and wanted to had probably tried. But where I was wondering is more outside the box with some of the heavyweight guys from Belarus for example who seem to be good athletes. I know, I’m stretching it. Just a thought.
     
  11. MeanJoeBlue

    MeanJoeBlue Well-Known Member

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    In all seriousness, I think that was coached into him (if he wasn’t always like that).

    Ever since LeBeau was DC, ZBA was a defining trait of the defensive backs. They run up to the receiver and raise the arms and pray the ball happens to hit them. The only way to have that many players refusing to turn around is if they are coached to do it.

    That’s part of the reason why Brady and Flacco had big games vs. the Steelers. Most QBs won’t throw if the player is tightly covered. Brady and Flacco would throw it anyways, because they knew the DB wasn’t going to turn around.

    (It’s different if the DB has a 20 yard cushion, and has to run towards the QB to get to the receiver. But if the DB has to run with the WR down the field... ZBA.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2020
  12. TheTerribleOwl

    TheTerribleOwl Well-Known Member

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    Ike Taylor was a really good corner for a lot of years. If he could catch at all he would have been elite but he couldn't. Still can't believe he actually caught that one in the Super Bowl.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
  13. The Glory Days

    The Glory Days Well-Known Member

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    Secondary still needs to improve dramatically. Fitz made a big impact on the secondary, but the strength of the D is the rush. When we failed to get pressure, the secondary fell apart.
     
  14. Roonatic

    Roonatic Well-Known Member

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    That rush we had two years ago disagrees. Minkah improved the the front seven enough to make Bud Dupree significant. Tall order if you ask me.
     
  15. BK99

    BK99 Well-Known Member

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    No, that technique isn't coached...LOL!! The DBs we had during the LeBeau era were good tacklers pass route disrupters, they were physical. The problem with the secondary happened when the rules were changed to help P. Manning get to a super bowl. When the rules changed the style of play in the secondary changed and we had the wrong type of DB. Edmunds fits right in with what LeBeau would have wanted, he believed in keeping the play in front and applying pressure.

    Getting decent CBs helped but the missing piece was Fitzpatrick who knows where to be on the field and can force QBs away from downfield receivers. Edmunds would be ok if he had the football I.Q. to understand what the offense is doing and what the defensive counter is. Instead he reacts to what is happening which means the QB and WRs can manipulate him out of position when they want to throw downfield.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  16. MeanJoeBlue

    MeanJoeBlue Well-Known Member

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    It is anecdotal.
    But watch those older games, and tell me you don't see the same thing.
    Anytime the Steelers DB is running away from the line of scrimmage (like down the sideline), the pattern was the same:
    • Get almost facemask to facemask with the receiver
    • Don't turn around to spot the ball (to avoid being faked by a double move, maybe)
    • Raise arms up in the air and wave them, hoping to deflect the ball by luck, or distract the receiver's vision
    • Tackle after the ball is caught, instead of breaking up the catch
    It happened often enough with Steelers players (and not the opposing team) that it didn't seem to be random.

    The times when the DB would go for the interception or breaking up the pass was when they were deeper than the receiver and were moving towards the LoS, when they would see the pass without having to turn around.
     
  17. JAD

    JAD Well-Known Member

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    I'll tell what I always saw with Coach Chuck Noll teams in practices in the seventies. When a Steelers DB is running away from the line of scrimmage (like down the sideline) when the ball was thrown and in the air the whole defense and sideline players and coaches would yell "BALL", this tipped the DB the ball was coming and to turn and make a play on the ball. They would do this on every long ball thrown during practices and the games.

    Agree though that we didn't see this with Lebeau's team, as they played more zone, farther back, and tried to keep everything in front.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2020
    • Like Like x 1
  18. The Glory Days

    The Glory Days Well-Known Member

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    I don't think Fitz directly improved the front seven. He didn't goose Bud or make a voodoo doll of him. Bud lit his own fire and performed. Fitz just gave the secondary enough added stability to allow the rush an extra second or so to get home. Still, a tall order that no one since Troy was able to do. Props to Fitz for that.

    And yes, I know that Troy was SS and Minkah is FS. I'm not comparing their roles, just their impact. Figured I should say that before a purist shows up complaining about me and my lack of Steeler knowledge.
     
  19. Formerscribe

    Formerscribe Well-Known Member

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    Somebody posted a great video breakdown of Fitzpatrick's play for the Steelers. Even though he plays a different position, his big plays come from the same type of freelancing that once led to so many big plays by Polamalu.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  20. groutbrook

    groutbrook

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    That's exactly how he improved the performance of the front seven (Nelson's ability to cover helped also imo).
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  21. Roonatic

    Roonatic Well-Known Member

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    :bowdown:
    Valid points.
    Chicken dinner for you.
    I'll see myself out & take my 'Tomlin speak' with me.
     
  22. Roonatic

    Roonatic Well-Known Member

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    He makes QBs worry about where he is.
     
  23. Daddymac10

    Daddymac10 Well-Known Member

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    If you never look for the ball defending a pass, there's a good chance you'll never intercept a ball in your career ..let along break a pass up. Why are the coaches not teaching him how to defend against a pass?? Is it not common sense to track & play the ball?? If this dude don't start playing the ball, he'll never ever be a playmaker...
     
  24. thesteeldeal

    thesteeldeal Well-Known Member

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    The problem is read , reaction and anticipation skills. There’s a reason some guys are considered ball hawks at Safety. It’s because they have the natural instincts. Much like a CF in baseball. Not everyone can play CF. They can be a outstanding corner OF but not a good CF. Right now TE isn’t a CF and whenever he tasked with being the last line of defense all his shortcomings are put on display. It’s tough, if not a impossible skill to learn. The best bet is to try and eliminate putting him in that position. That’s why I’ve always felt the closer you can move him to the LOS, the better.

    As far as turning around for the ball again it’s a skill. The problem is when in a trailing position looking back for the ball could spell disaster. That’s why players are taught to read the WRs eyes and hands to time the break up of a pass. Most INTs are made with the player anticipating a throw and reacting downhill toward the ball. You do have some jump ball type INTs but most times when a DB is trailing he’s looking to break up the completion first and foremost.
     

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